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029 Concussion wrap up

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029 Concussion wrap up

By Jurmaine Health

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We talked about some effects of concussion; looking spacey and exhibiting non-integrated movement patterns. This does not just happen in contact sports but in any other sports with risks of falling like horse riding. See you at the Embodied Recovery at the Training Geek, TG Strength, this Saturday at 12pm! Complimentary Embodied Athlete workshop live in person right after the Embodied Recovery workshop. Tickets can be purchased in bio!

SHERMAIN [05:51]

It’s like compartments in the neck. So speaking of compartment syndrome in the neck, it’s not that I am saying that there is a lot that people come up with. Okay. I guess but what it is, is that people forget that and quite easily can’t forget that people human beings can get compartments syndrome anywhere in the earlier days of CrossFit and I mentioned that in a paper and several workshops over the years have given crossfitters during competitions they look like they have got a compartment syndrome for their torso.

SHERMAIN [07:28]

Yeah to reduce inflammation via nutritional intervention, nutritional and supplementation intervention, that’s what they tried to do. And then also, there’s the visual and vestibular aspect of it. That’s what everyone tries to adhere to and do as a first point of call. And then what most people miss is the neck and the tissues over the neck and this is part of psychological.

SHERMAIN [12:36]

Exactly right. So, the autonomic nervous system is affected the central nervous system is affected the sympathetic nervous system is affected parasympathetic nervous system is affected and peripheral nervous system is affected.

Dr Shermain Wong is a seasoned chiropractor with particular expertise in Sports Medicine and a passion for the benefits of in ‘Active Release Technique™ (an advanced Soft Tissue Technique developed by Chiropractors). She is professionally trained in ART and has a Masters in Clinical Chiropractic from RMIT University. Dr Wong has provided chiropractic and movement rehabilitation services at international sporting competitions, and provided rehabilitation and training for professional dancers, professional football players and professional athletes.

She can be found at https://www.jurmainehealth.com.au/dr-shermain-wong/

Episode 029 : Concussion wrap up

Podcast brought to you by Jurmaine Health

JACKIE [00:11]

This is Jurmaine Health, the center to help you achieve in wellness in both your brain and body. We endeavor to encourage cross communication between health professionals for your health and well being. We'll bring you topics on functional neurological health such as neuro psychology, neuro behavior, neuro musculoskeletal, neurogastro, the embodied project, metabolism and microbiome, which are also some of the services that we provide. In today's podcast, we continue on with concussions and post concussion syndrome. And this will also conclude our head and neck series. We've got a quick disclaimer guys, so before we start, none of what we're discussing today is to be taken as medical advice. DM if you have any concerns, please do seek help from your healthcare practitioner. So let's continue on with our concussion talk. We've talked about in the previous series in our whiplash and concussion episode, I believe it was, part one and two. So we sort of introduced that where we were just talking about the mechanism of a concussion in pretty much in most cases, everyone knows that. It's a knock or a hit or a blow to the head in any way, shape or form. So it doesn't necessarily mean you were whacked in the head, or you were hit with playing boxing or doing any fighting sports. It can also be a landing on...

SHERMAIN [01:39]

I think the main one that you were driving was it doesn't have to be from a car accident.

JACKIE [01:45]

Yes. Well, that was for whiplash more so we were talking about that. Yeah. It's all good. Somebody keenly listened to our podcast and got the full gist of what we were talking about.

SHERMAIN [01:58]

Take home message.

I got home

JACKIE [02:01]

So no that was for whiplash that we were driving that one through. The concussion one was it was it's a, it's a knock to the head. It was just in the sense of in this case I would say it doesn't have to be indirect. Somebody hit you over the head. It can be from falls.

SHERMAIN [02:18]

Yeah.

JACKIE [02:19]

And a lot of the time we sit here. I know I've seen it a few times with one particular case where this poor person had fallen off a horse about three times. And it wasn't until the last fall that it was diagnosed as a concussion. Because the first to the doctor just like quiet, this is fine. It was only the third one because she completely passed out and had no recollection to waking up in the hospital. That was the only time that it was recorded as a concussion. Or is it my fault here for her pretty much had at least so that is like three concussions I believe. Wasn't that Shermain? I think I'd get at least three or four and this is in the space of like 18 months. And we went from concussion to post concussion syndrome. Then we were all looking at

anything you're nodding at me Shermain. So anything you're looking at having currently?

SHERMAIN [03:13]

Well, right I can't remember the case quite clearly. But even after her training on vestibular training and all those kind of things, or even balance or gait, she still looked a little bit unsteady. Not mentally unstable. It's just her. Yes. She's, yeah, she still looks spacey. Yeah, she still had it. So it was observational wise. She looks spacey. She looked like her gait and balance were not integrated properly. But I think it was that I didn't see this patient. So I can�t really comment. It's just in passing. That's what I saw. So I wanted to catch up with... Was that correct?

JACKIE [03:52]

Yeah, that one was correct. We worked as much as we could. So she was the spaceyness, yes, she had her moments where she was a lot more focused. Yes, but then yes, she had her she'd be telling me for like uni purposes and stuff like that, that yes, she was struggling to focus on like, say reading for an extended period of time or being able to zone in on what's being said, she was losing that.

SHERMAIN [04:14]

So both is a reception of auditory. Yep. Auditory motor learning, yes, auditory motor learning patterns, as well as visual Yeah. But what wasn't it such that she was seeing someone for really long?

JACKIE [04:31]

Yeah, she was seeing someone else for it as well for like you said the vestibular training. That's what was done. And they were looking at working with a heart rate and stuff as well. So I didn't quite understand why they were trying to push her heart rate up to see what it does. It wasn't affecting her in any way shape or form. But I thought it was an interesting thing that they were doing an interesting test, proved nothing and it didn't really change anything apart from exhausting the poor girl but beyond that it was predominantly what we were doing here that she was getting the most relief. And that was a lot of it had to be pretty much was getting her neck settled in the mean time that she'd be coming in. And her whole neck was pretty much like puffed up and it was

SHERMAIN [05:14]

Swollen

JACKIE [05:15]

Yeah, it was nicely swollen that it was just like no wonder you're having issue currently now everything's being compressed because it just literally feels like you've got fluid in that whole neck of yours. There isn't you're not going to get much movement unless you come in, like Shermain said. You could even say it with her neck and stuff because it was a very stiff neck because it wasn't just

SHERMAIN [05:35]

Is it like is it most like, what's that word called? Cuff you know like, um, pump was

JACKIE [05:41]

Yeah, she had like a cuff it was really like a cuff literally like a cuff around her neck and

SHERMAIN [05:49]

compartment syndrome.

JACKIE [05:50]

Yeah

SHERMAIN [05:51]

It's like compartment syndrome in the neck. So speaking of compartment syndrome in the neck, it's not that I am saying that that is what people come up with. Okay. I guess but what it is, is that people forget that and quite easily can forget that people human beings can get compartments syndrome anywhere in the earlier days of CrossFit and I mentioned that in a paper and several workshops over the years that I have have given, crossfitters during competitions they look like they have got a compartment syndrome for their torso.

JACKIE [06:26]

Yeah.

SHERMAIN [06:27]

And not just their arms no so I was like, so I was thinking myself here I pierced their body just

deflated. And, and slow up into the air dramatically.

JACKIE [06:42]

There was this visual that I just had in my head.

SHERMAIN [06:51]

And that�s animatic and dramatic, so that doesn't happen for people just in case if you're worried, what it is as well as with testing these days, with acute concussion, what they try to do is do test of the heart rate to see if they can sustain that blood flow. And does that impact the blood flow into the brain? And that's why they predominantly do so. And also the second thing they probably do is to reduce inflammation too.

JACKIE [07:26]

Yeah, they didn't do that for those of us that will be working via nutritional intervention

SHERMAIN [07:28]

Yeah to reduce inflammation via nutritional intervention, nutritional and supplementation intervention, that's what they tried to do. And then also, there's the visual and vestibular aspect of it. That's what everyone tries to adhere to and do as a first point of call. And then what most people miss is the neck and the tissues around the neck and then there is also psychological.

JACKIE [07:58]

Yeah

SHERMAIN [07:59]

So there are five parts to concussion. A lot of people just do one or two. And that is not a complete system to recover that. So in the head when there's a process knocked about and things like that in an angiogram, I don't know is there an angiogram for the brain

JACKIE [08:20]

Yeah, I think so.

SHERMAIN [08:21]

Angiogram for the brain, sometimes it looks fantastically normal. The thing about measurements of tissues, especially tissues within the brain, that's almost literally impossible to measure. Not unless a person has got a baseline measurement of what's happening and before and after. And then we'll have a baseline. So what happens is that when these youngsters in sport go for an angiogram, a lot of times they can't, the doctors or the specialists can't find or will be hard pressed to find a positive result that comes up from it. Muscle memory bleeding on the brain unless there is bleeding of the brain or a clot. And then that will be a stroke. That'd be a different case altogether, right? But the tissues in our brain and can be, it's pretty much like a tissue in a pit in a bucket of water. So it will be shaken it will be contacting the cranium, and it will be sloshing around within the cranium. That is exactly what happened.

JACKIE [09:31]

Yes, exactly.

SHERMAIN [09:32]

So it's a bit of a concussion. Yeah.

It is eventually. Yeah. Well, the other day I described someone's stomach like slimy texture.

This is a digression but and I was describing someone's stomach as I said. Well your stomach musculature is usually fine. Yeah, it's a bit small but firm but he also is like deflated and inflammy and viscous and slimy and I was like and he was like and then the funny thing is that I understand what you're saying. I think it's slimy

Okay, that worked

yeah I've been having a lot of anti-inflammes and painkillers I'm really suffering from it right now also.

Yes.

Maybe this one's deflated.

Well, we got a call

For good

it's pretty accurately on track. So with concussion it's sloshy. It's some it's interesting the tissues give away a lot of indicators whether a person hinge properly, or have they healed properly or not.

JACKIE [11:00]

What are the tissues to you guys?

SHERMAIN [11:03]

For me it almost depending on the person but it almost feels like one of the cerebral arteries that are at the left or the right, who have a lower pulse, lower pulse rate, and they almost feel like a distraction pattern this, cervical distraction. You're not talking about using a pulley system. Distract, it's just a light cervical distraction almost always gives them a relief that's 2. And the other one is the lymphatics around the neck is a big deal too also a type of a swollen neck. Hence the swollen neck and what people don't realize is that is what impacted the breath their breath patterns will be impacted. If the breath patterns are impacted, what happens is that there are research showing that our breath depending on how our breath works it affects the resonance of the brainstem. So, when brainstem because of the flow because of how it interferes with the flow of the CSF cerebral spinal fluid for people who are listening. So, when that happens you have a whole system being impacted not just white space not just any

JACKIE [12:34]

central nervous system pretty much being affected

SHERMAIN [12:36]

Exactly right. So, the autonomic nervous system is affected the central nervous system is affected the sympathetic nervous system is affected parasympathetic nervous system is affected and peripheral nervous system is affected.

JACKIE [12:52]

SHERMAIN [12:54]

Yeah, and entire nervous system will be affected. So, you have got five or six of your nervous system, the organs in the body the systems in the body are all affected. And plus blood flow plus, you know, the psychological interference. Before you were talking about vestibular, visual, any of those things

JACKIE [13:17]

This is why we always have a tendency to focus on breathing guys, we just mentioned how many systems are affected when you're poorly breathing. So if you hear us drumming into the importance of breathing properly, or how giving you exercises for breathing this is why

SHERMAIN [13:34]

so in the next, not probably in the next episode, but soon enough, we'll probably have a one of our neuropsychologists speaking about their perception on concussion, how they detect body test how they detect what is their take on it what's their expertise on it? That's one and then another episode we'll probably talk about the shape of our spines. Back to the shape of our spine. Yes, yeah. And with cervical �

JACKIE [14:11]

� You need with radiology reports.

SHERMAIN [14:14]

Radiology reports. We were probably film it for you guys.

JACKIE [14:17]

Yeah, you guys need to listen to this podcast. Yeah. It's a very interesting one.

SHERMAIN [14:24]

And how it affects our gait, our running, how people think they need to give you cues if you are a lifter or an athlete or something like that. So these are the things coming up. And we have Embodied Recovery. Next week. Workshop. Next week. Well, next week, next Saturday

JACKIE [14:46]

27th of April, guys. Yes, at Training Geek Morrabbin. Don't forget that one. And then we've also got our Embodied Athlete following, is that a word? Is that a webinar or is that just no it's an in person. So guys, if you want to see us in person for our Embodied Athlete, please also come down. So it will be following directly after the Embodied Recovery workshop. So I'd probably recommend getting yourself to both because the recovery part is a very big part of the Embodied Athlete. So it would definitely benefit you if you haven't already attended our previous one that was held in Preston.

SHERMAIN [15:28]

For the Embodied Recovery. Yeah, in March. This one will look quite different from the last one. And it'll be interesting, because every time we are doing one of these workshops, we are very self-critical. So we'll

JACKIE [15:42]

change it up

SHERMAIN [15:43]

and we will evolve it and change it up all over again Yeah.

JACKIE [15:45]

And there's gonna be new content as well.

SHERMAIN [15:48]

So if you've done it the first time,

JACKIE [15:50]

come down again

SHERMAIN [15:51]

jump in on a second one, you'll still learn new information.

JACKIE [15:53]

We've got a few that have registered from the previous one. So yeah,

SHERMAIN [15:58]

you do you

JACKIE [16:04]

That's us for today. Hopefully have a lovely Easter break or have a lovely Easter long weekend if you get time off.

SHERMAIN [16:12]

Jackie is eyeballing me and giving me the piercing stare because she knows that I am really busy and not getting rest

JACKIE [16:20]

So I am trying to encourage everyone including our colleagues

SHERMAIN [16:26]

to get some rest

JACKIE [16:29]

And that�s it with us guys, if you like what we're presenting, give us a thumbs up a like or share it with one other person who you think we may be able to help. For those of you who are coaches, dancers or athletes, and may find difficulty in expressing or executing movement patterns. Please do connect with us on our website which is www.JURMAINEHEALTH.com.au and JURMAINEHEALTH is spelled J U R M A I N E H E A L T H. Or socialize with us on our Facebook, which is JURMAINEHEALTH and our Instagram which is JURMAINEHEALTH body. Just one more thing, guys. If you're enjoying our podcast, send a screenshot of yourself enjoying it and send it to us and we'll repost it and give you a shout out.

SHERMAIN [17:13]

How sweet. That's good.

JACKIE[17:14]

And last but not least, since this podcast is made for you, our clients, patients and fans, do let us know what else you might think you'd like to hear about from us. That's all for today, see you bye.

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2020-06-19T11:04:14+00:00