BOOK ONLINE 03 9478 1810

061 What is neuropsychology?

MORE EPISODES

Jurmaine Health Podcasts / What is neuropsychology?

061 What is neuropsychology?

By Jurmaine Health

Share:

On this episode, meet our Brain team, team of neuropsychologists and registrars: Dr Judy Tang, Kimberley and Evelyn.

Find out exactly what we do and how we all fell into this field. Learn the difference between psychology and neuropsychology.
How do we help people?
What impacts the efficiency of your cognition?

KIMBERLEY [00:38]

So someone asked you random stranger oh, what do you do? So neuro psychology is always thinking skills is what I come to. So thinking skills that we use in everyday life such as paying attention to something being able to remember things, being able to plan out your day being able to communicate with people always thinking skills is sort of how I conceptualize what psychology is and then when they asked what do you do, if you say, you know, when you’re a psychology registrar, what do you say what do you do? Registrar.

Explain that. It’s like a doctor’s internship. So doctors, they do their degree and then after they’ve got their qualifications, they need to go into a hospital and they receive supervision while they are learning on the job.

KIMBERLEY [04:13]

They don’t ask that. They just assume that I am a psychologist. I am a psychologist in the sense of a clinical psychologist. So they sort of ignore the neuro part. And is he a psychologist? Oh yes. Can I that? Yeah. He said he did counseling. And so that’s when I asked her to step in and say clinical psychology is that’s what people usually think of when they say psychologists, which is a little bit different from a neuropsychologist that focuses more on those brain processes and dealing with the brain disorders and brain diseases.

EVELYN [01:54]

Yeah. Well, when we talk about thinking skills, and I guess the other word that comes up is cognition. So a lot of people might not be aware of what cognition is in. Cognition equals, I guess what Kimberley said, thinking skills. So things like your processing speed, your attention, visual spatial abilities. You know, numeracy, language memory is a big one, I guess planning organization, all those cognitive domains and your thinking skills that can be broken down into all those facets.

EVELYN [03:14]

So yeah, I think one of the things that is interesting is some I tend to tell people that because they say, well, why can’t you just put me into a scanner, like an MRI or a CT scan, and I say, well, that gives you the MRI scanner. And the CT scanner is great to give you a structural picture of what your brain looks like. But it doesn’t necessarily tell you how you are performing cognitively. And so that’s where neuropsychological assessments are useful because it tells us how your brain is functioning. Rather than just taking a picture of the brain. You’re actually telling the assessments tell you how your brain is functioning.

Kimberley Meates is a Clinical Neuropsychology Registrar at Jurmaine Health who has also worked as Therapy Assistant with Victoria Community Living.​

https://www.linkedin.com/in/kimberley-meates-622a76186/?originalSubdomain=au

AND

Evelyn Chen is a clinical neuropsychology registrar. She has clinical and research experience in aged care, public and private health care settings. With a Masters in Clinical Neuropsychology from The University of Melbourne (2017) and currently undertaking her PhD candidature at the same university, she specialises in traumatic brain injury assessments/management, as well as forensic and parenting capacity assessments. For her PhD, Evelyn is investigating the validity and reliability of tracking cognitive recovery in patients following a mild traumatic brain injury using smartphones.

https://www.facebook.com/criminallawmums/posts/2534141049979176:0

Episode 061 : What is neuropsychology?

Podcast brought to you by Jurmaine Health

[00:02]

Welcome to Jurmaine Health podcast where the center for brain and body improvement and our team that believes that everyone should live their best life in their best body and with their best brain.

JUDY [00:15]

Hi, everyone, my name is Judy. I'm here with Evelyn.

EVELYN [00:18]

Hello

JUDY [00:19]

And Kimberley.

KIMBERLEY [00:19]

Hi

JUDY [00:20]

and this is our first of hopefully many brain pops, where I'm a neuropsychologist and; Evelyn and Kimberley are neuropsychology registrars. So I guess the first thing we can talk about is what is neuropsychology? I've got my spill but I'm going to start with, let's do Kimberley first.

So when asked by random stranger oh, what do you do?

KIMBERLEY [00:38]

So, neuropsychology is always thinking skills is what I normally say. So thinking skills that we use in everyday life such as paying attention to something being able to remember things, being able to plan out your day being able to communicate with people always thinking skills is sort of how I conceptualize what psychology is and then when they asked what do you do, if you say, you know, when you're a psychology registrar, what do you say what do you do? Registrar.

Explain that. It's like a doctor's internship. So doctors, they do their degree and then after they've got their qualifications, they need to go into a hospital and they receive supervision while they are learning on the job.

JUDY [01:27]

Okay, easy. What's your spill Evelyn?

EVELYN [01:30]

I think it's pretty much in line with what Kimberley said.

JUDY

So, you're at a house party, which we will miss. You're at a party and someone says so Evelyn, what do you do? What do you say?

EVELYN [01:43]

I'd say I'm a clinical neuropsychology registrar. And the next question would be what is neuro psychology.

JUDY [01:49]

Yeah, exactly.

They go wow, that sounds really interesting.

EVELYN [01:54]

Yeah. Well, when we talk about thinking skills, and I guess the other word that comes up is cognition. So a lot of people might not be aware of what cognition is in. Cognition equals, I guess what Kimberley said, thinking skills. So things like your processing speed, your attention, visual spatial abilities. You know, numeracy, language memory is a big one, I guess planning organization, all those cognitive domains and your thinking skills that can be broken down into all those facets.

JUDY [02:28]

Yeah, okay. Yeah, I actually do the, I actually say almost the exact same thing. So guys,

you know, neuro psychology, we test all the thinking skills, and if any, what I do say is if any brain changes impact on thinking skills, and then I give examples like stroke, Parkinson's, motor car accidents and things like that. What else do I say? Lately, if I've been really lazy, I'll just say three words. I say, I do brain injury assessments. It's not exactly, doesn't really exactly encompass what we do. But I think it sums it up nicely for some people for the layperson. I think they understand that then I could say, okay, so brain injury and how that impacts on thinking. And I go on further from that.

EVELYN [03:14]

So yeah, I think one of the things that is interesting is some I tend to tell people that because they say, well, why can't you just put me into a scanner, like an MRI or a CT scan, and I say, well, that gives you the MRI scan, and the CT scanner is great to give you a structural picture of what your brain looks like. But it doesn't necessarily tell you how you are performing cognitively. And so that's where neuropsychological assessments are useful because it tells us how your brain is functioning. Rather than just taking a picture of the brain. You're actually telling the assessments tell you how your brain is functioning

JUDY [03:59]

And do people ask you any of you, how is neuropsychology different from other psychology? So they say, well, how's that different to. The most obvious comparison for us is clinical psychology. Yeah. Do people ask you that?

KIMBERLEY [04:13]

They don't ask that. They just assume that I am a psychologist. I am a psychologist in the sense of a clinical psychologist. So they sort of ignore the neuro part. And is a psychologist? Oh yes. Can I that? Yeah. He said he did counseling. And so that's when I asked her to step in and say clinical psychology is that's what people usually think of when they say psychologists, which is a little bit different from a neuropsychologist that focuses more on those brain processes and dealing with the brain disorders and brain diseases. So clinical psych

JUDY [04:53]

Yeah, I sometimes say to them, that we're different in the sense that a clin psych might deal with matters of the heart, so to speak. And the neuroscience deals with matters of the head. And sometimes people get that makes it a bit easier as well. If I'm feeling a bit negative, and sarcastic, and I'll say we are psychologist that don't care as much

JUDY [05:18]

interesting, the brain

EVELYN [05:22]

When it comes to neuro psychology, if we look at mood disorders, and you're looking at the face of the heart, I guess, yeah, that impacts on cognition. So I think we're well versed in that regard in terms of how mood and anxiety and all of the other I guess mental health disorders impact on cognition. So we all sit, I guess, almost on like the cusp in the sense.

JUDY [05:50]

And as you say, one of my lectures from way back did remind us that we're not just neuropsychologist with clinical neuropsychologist and for her, that we sometimes forget that clinical side of what we do. So yes, we do do. We do care.

KIMBERLEY [06:09]

We do have a lot of those skills as well. I'm happy to see my training to clinical psychologists.

JUDY [06:16]

Yeah. Alright. Well, how about really quickly? Because I actually don't think I've ever asked either. Oh, asked you Evelyn, maybe give us you know, quick couple of minutes on how you got into neuro psychology.

EVELYN [06:27]

Oh, whoa. Oh, well, I was a trained teacher, and also a fine artist. Degree in fine art. And then so, I ran my own business teaching adults. And then I got bored essentially, and had a child as you do when you get bored. And I guess, when he was about a year old, decided to go for the Summer Intensive undergrads psych thing for three months, which means that you've done your first year in psychology and I thought, well, let's do that for a summer for three months. Did it, really enjoyed it and then just kept going and going and going and here I am? Yeah, he ha. I've gone to honors and then I guess I did really well in the neuroscience area of things. And here I am, I'm just still going, doing a PhD.

EVELYN [07:34]

Finishing finishing. Fingers crossed.

JUDY [07:38]

Yes, Kimberley tell us how you got into neuro psych.

KIMBERLEY [07:42]

So I had an interest from when I was a teenager in the brain. Yeah, I remember reading things. I was a bit of a weird teenager I guess. Yeah, I always had that interest in psychology and the brain. And I was studying neuroscience in my undergraduate and then did psychology as part of that degree. And yeah was introduced I think it was Jenny Botsford who introduced me to neuro psychology � and thought that it was amazing

JUDY [08:11]

Did you, were you like me and probably weren't like me from the sounds of it. I actually didn't know the difference between neuro psychology and clin psych. And so for my post grad, I actually applied for a whole bunch of clin psych sort of degrees, which in hindsight, I'm not suited for and I had no idea that it was neuro psychology that was really interested in. So luckily, I did get into neuro psychology. And that's how I ended up sticking to neuroscience. I was lucky. Because again, imagine how's the other side so I just don't think I'll be as good at it.

EVELYN [08:44]

I thought long and hard between those two between clin psych and neuropsych of the both, but eventually because I think I really liked the neuropsych part of things. Yes. And I know I can incorporate things from clin psych into neuropsych. That worked for me.

JUDY [09:02]

Now how easy was that? Well that's it so when people ask us what's neuropsychology is, now you know how we'll answer.

JUDY [09:08]

and I guess for us if you have any questions feel free to contact us at JERMAINE HEALTH which is J U R M A I N E H E A L T H jurmainehealth.com.au. Catch you there. Thank you.

[09:23]

Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed our podcast, feel free to connect with us on Instagram at jurmainehealthbody all one word we always welcome feedback and ideas too. And we're happy to answer any questions just reach out to us at our website, www.jurmainehealth.com.au. Listen in weekly for the most relevant information on how to live your best life with your best brain and body.

Share:

About the Show

Welcome to Jurmaine Health podcast where the Center for brain and body improvement and our team that believes that everyone should live their best life in the best body and with the best brain.

YOUR HOST:

Jurmaine Health

Let us help you

Our caring team is here to help. Our services aim to help both your brain and body achieve optimal health. Contact our Neuropsychological & Neuromusculoskeletal team for effective advice, assessment and management of your concerns and issues.

ENQUIRE ONLINE
03 9478 1810

HEAD CLINIC
538A Murray Road
Preston, Victoria 3072

03 9478 1810
Mon-Fri: 8:00am – 7:00pm
Sat: 8:00am – 2:00pm

CONNECT WITH US

  • Brain

  • Body

Jurmaine Health acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Elders in each of the communities where we work.

At our clinic, we accept a variety of payment methods. Medicare rebates can be electronically claimed by us at the time of payment:

Our clinic takes accessibility seriously and has an on-site ramp and disabled toilets:

2020-06-19T11:05:22+00:00