Tendinopathy2018-09-26T16:49:30+00:00

Tendinopathy

Tendinopathy refers to tendon pain or injury due to overuse and can occur with any tendon throughout the human body. One of the most common forms of tendinopathy is ‘Tendonitis’,, which refers to the acute injury and inflammation of a tendon, followed by the less prevalent ‘Tendinosis’, which describes a chronic tendon injury with no inflammation.

Manual therapies on muscles, ligaments, capsules, nerves and bones such as Active Release Technique (ART), or fascia manipulation and taping can generally help sufferers of tendinopathy.

Tendinopathy is often thought of as a ‘sports injury’, however it can occur with people of all ages and backgrounds, regardless of their physical activity levels. It is generally a result of ‘over-use’, particularly from activities which involve a repetitive motion – in these cases it is considered to be a type of Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI). It can also be simply a result of aging.

When a tendon is placed under pressure, it can suffer from micro-tears which will heal over time when treated effectively. However if rather than being rested the tendon is constantly exposed to the same stress, the damage can occur more quickly than the body can heal itself, resulting in a tendinopathy.

Generally speaking, most forms of tendinopathy will respond well to treatment and healing will occur within a few weeks to several months. It is important to not exacerbate the injury by irritating or disrupting the tendon’s healing process before it is ready to be used again, otherwise long-term damage can occur and the condition will become chronic.

A rehabilitation schedule, including manual therapies (on muscles, ligaments, capsules, nerves, bones) such as Active Release Technique (ART), or fascia manipulation and taping can help to ease the pain of tendinopathy.

Causes of tendinopathy

  • Over use of the tendon
  • Wear and tear to the tendon as a result of ageing
  • Repetitive strain injury
  • Obesity

The following demographics are considered to be high-risk candidates for tendinopathy:

  • People with diabetes
  • Post-menopausal women
  • Men with fat around their midsection
  • Athletes who have sustained an injury

Other symptoms of tendinopathy

  • Mild to severe pain in the affected area
  • Stiffness in the affected area
  • Redness in the affected area
  • Swelling in the affected area
  • Tenderness in the affected area
  • Decreased movement and strength
  • Sluggishness in the affected area
  • Warmth in the affected area
  • A ‘crunchy’ sensation when using the tendon
  • Symptoms which worsen at night and alleviate as the day progresses

Top tips for tendon care

  • Wear supportive shoes when participating in sports
  • Ensure that you perform warm up and cool down stretches when exercising
  • Gradually increase the intensity of your workouts, rather than suddenly
  • Allow for recovery time between workouts
  • Use correct technique to avoid tendon stress or strain
  • Consider inserting shock-absorbing orthotics into your shoes
  • Consider using taping or bandaging your legs, to bind your tendons to the shin
  • Avoid sports and physical activities which cause tendon pain

Effective treatment of tendinopathy

Tendinopathy can be treated quite effectively at home, by following some simple guidelines:

  • Allow the area which is causing you pain lots of rest
  • Use an ice pack and hold to the affected area
  • Practice muscle strengthening and stretching exercises

Jurmaine Health can assist with a mechanics assessment and provide you with understanding about how you should utilise your body in your chosen sport or repetitive activity.  We can provide a customised and comprehensive rehabilitation schedule suited to you. This may include the usage of manual therapy (on muscles, ligaments, capsules, nerves, bones) such as Active Release Technique (ART), or fascia manipulation and taping, which is effective for helping to treat the pain and promote healing of tendinopathy.

CTA – Call Jurmaine Health for a personalised treatment plan

For more serious injuries, your doctor may recommend that you undertake steroid injections, Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy (ESWT), ultrasound therapy of in extreme cases, surgery.

Tendinopathy

Tendinopathy refers to tendon pain or injury due to overuse and can occur with any tendon throughout the human body. One of the most common forms of tendinopathy is ‘Tendonitis’,, which refers to the acute injury and inflammation of a tendon, followed by the less prevalent ‘Tendinosis’, which describes a chronic tendon injury with no inflammation.

Manual therapies on muscles, ligaments, capsules, nerves and bones such as Active Release Technique (ART), or fascia manipulation and taping can generally help sufferers of tendinopathy.

Tendinopathy is often thought of as a ‘sports injury’, however it can occur with people of all ages and backgrounds, regardless of their physical activity levels. It is generally a result of ‘over-use’, particularly from activities which involve a repetitive motion – in these cases it is considered to be a type of Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI). It can also be simply a result of aging.

When a tendon is placed under pressure, it can suffer from micro-tears which will heal over time when treated effectively. However if rather than being rested the tendon is constantly exposed to the same stress, the damage can occur more quickly than the body can heal itself, resulting in a tendinopathy.

Generally speaking, most forms of tendinopathy will respond well to treatment and healing will occur within a few weeks to several months. It is important to not exacerbate the injury by irritating or disrupting the tendon’s healing process before it is ready to be used again, otherwise long-term damage can occur and the condition will become chronic.

A rehabilitation schedule, including manual therapies (on muscles, ligaments, capsules, nerves, bones) such as Active Release Technique (ART), or fascia manipulation and taping can help to ease the pain of tendinopathy.

Causes of tendinopathy

  • Over use of the tendon
  • Wear and tear to the tendon as a result of ageing
  • Repetitive strain injury
  • Obesity

The following demographics are considered to be high-risk candidates for tendinopathy:

  • People with diabetes
  • Post-menopausal women
  • Men with fat around their midsection
  • Athletes who have sustained an injury

Other symptoms of tendinopathy

  • Mild to severe pain in the affected area
  • Stiffness in the affected area
  • Redness in the affected area
  • Swelling in the affected area
  • Tenderness in the affected area
  • Decreased movement and strength
  • Sluggishness in the affected area
  • Warmth in the affected area
  • A ‘crunchy’ sensation when using the tendon
  • Symptoms which worsen at night and alleviate as the day progresses

Top tips for tendon care

  • Wear supportive shoes when participating in sports
  • Ensure that you perform warm up and cool down stretches when exercising
  • Gradually increase the intensity of your workouts, rather than suddenly
  • Allow for recovery time between workouts
  • Use correct technique to avoid tendon stress or strain
  • Consider inserting shock-absorbing orthotics into your shoes
  • Consider using taping or bandaging your legs, to bind your tendons to the shin
  • Avoid sports and physical activities which cause tendon pain

Effective treatment of tendinopathy

Tendinopathy can be treated quite effectively at home, by following some simple guidelines:

  • Allow the area which is causing you pain lots of rest
  • Use an ice pack and hold to the affected area
  • Practice muscle strengthening and stretching exercises

Jurmaine Health can assist with a mechanics assessment and provide you with understanding about how you should utilise your body in your chosen sport or repetitive activity.  We can provide a customised and comprehensive rehabilitation schedule suited to you. This may include the usage of manual therapy (on muscles, ligaments, capsules, nerves, bones) such as Active Release Technique (ART), or fascia manipulation and taping, which is effective for helping to treat the pain and promote healing of tendinopathy.

CTA – Call Jurmaine Health for a personalised treatment plan

For more serious injuries, your doctor may recommend that you undertake steroid injections, Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy (ESWT), ultrasound therapy of in extreme cases, surgery.

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