Dementia2018-09-26T15:45:09+00:00

Dementia

There are several types of dementia. The most common are Alzheimer’s, Vascular and Frontotemporal Dementia

Jurmaine Health’s Neuropsychologists have specialist skills in assessing mental functioning and can provide provide detailed assessments that assist in diagnosing the cognitive impacts of dementia. The neuropsychology assessment can also help to provide a baseline so that changes can be compared to determine the progression of dementia over time. Assessments of decision-making capacity can also be used when appointing a Power of Attorney.

Our clinical neuropsychology assessments consist of an interview followed by a range of tests appropriate to the clients requirements. Results from the assessment are then used to create plans and/or recommendations for the individual, to aid in the medico-legal requirements.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. Alzheimer’s disease occurs through progressive damage to brain cells. The damage to these brain cells affects memory, emotions, thinking skills, mood and behaviour. This results in an impaired ability to perform daily activities and tasks, and as the disease progresses, the symptoms become worse. In most cases Alzheimer’s disease progresses slowly however.

Symptoms include:

  • Memory loss
  • Vague everyday conversation
  • Loss of enthusiasm
  • Becoming disoriented
  • Social skill deterioration
  • Mood, personality and behaviour changes
  • Language difficulties

How does Alzheimer’s Dementia affect thinking?

Alzheimer’s disease has an array of cognitive and physical impacts on a person. Quite often memory loss is the first recognised symptom. Due to some insight in these early stages, the person may be aware when they struggle to remember, and then they can become agitated, aggressive or frustrated.

Appointing a Power of Attorney
Alzheimer’s disease impacts not only the person with the disease, but also their families. As the disease progresses, there will be more functional difficulties faced. it is important that once a diagnosis has been made, the family start to think about appointing a Power of Attorney. A Power of Attorney cannot be put in place unless the person with the disease has the mental capacity to agree to the decision and therefore timing is crucial.

Frontotemporal Dementia
Frontotemporal dementia is when there is progressive damage to the frontal and/or temporal lobes of the brain. Damage to the frontal lobes of the brain can result in reduced intellectual abilities, as well as changes in personality, emotion and behaviour. Damage to the temporal lobes can result in difficulty recognising objects, understanding or expressing language.

Frontotemporal dementia can affect anybody, however it usually affects people at a younger age than Alzheimer’s disease, with the symptoms appearing at age 50 or sometimes even earlier. Currently there is no definite understanding of who is likely to get frontotemporal dementia,however some research has found that approximately a third of people with frontotemporal dementia have a family history of dementia.

How does Frontotemporal Dementia affect thinking?

Frontotemporal dementia has many effects on the way a person thinks and interacts with the world around them. The changes that occur, depending on the area of the brain damaged, can quite often leave the person becoming quite frustrated or angry when they cannot do a task that they are trying to complete. This can mean that they believe that they cannot perform certain tasks, and therefore begin to lose motivation to try.

How may Frontotemporal Dementia affect everyday function?

The symptoms of frontotemporal dementia mean that there are a variety of impacts on the person’s life. For those who have damage to the frontal lobes, they experience behavioural, personality and emotional changes. These changes mean that they may come across as being selfish, lacking empathy, and being unkept. This can result in a loss of personal relationships or difficulty with making and maintaining new friendships.

For those who have damage to the temporal lobes, they experiences changes in their language abilities and recognition of familiar people. This means that they will frequently experience issues with reading, spelling, comprehension, verbal expression, and facial recognition. Consequently there can be a great impact on their ability to function at work, as well as at home with everyday tasks.

How can an assessment help?

A neuropsychology assessment can provide a baseline so that changes can be compared to determine progression of the dementia over time.  Clinical neuropsychology assessments can also be used in medicolegal cases, determining decision making capacity, and in identifying possible insurance recovery.

Clinical Neuropsychology assessments consist of an interview followed by a range of tests appropriate to the clients requirements. Results from the assessment are then used to create plans and/or recommendations for the individual.

Testing involves standardised tests that evaluate cognitive function in the following areas:

  • Cognitive ability
  • Memory
  • Reasoning
  • Problem solving
  • Emotions
  • Personality

Dementia

There are several types of dementia. The most common are Alzheimer’s, Vascular and Frontotemporal Dementia

Jurmaine Health’s Neuropsychologists have specialist skills in assessing mental functioning and can provide provide detailed assessments that assist in diagnosing the cognitive impacts of dementia. The neuropsychology assessment can also help to provide a baseline so that changes can be compared to determine the progression of dementia over time. Assessments of decision-making capacity can also be used when appointing a Power of Attorney.

Our clinical neuropsychology assessments consist of an interview followed by a range of tests appropriate to the clients requirements. Results from the assessment are then used to create plans and/or recommendations for the individual, to aid in the medico-legal requirements.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. Alzheimer’s disease occurs through progressive damage to brain cells. The damage to these brain cells affects memory, emotions, thinking skills, mood and behaviour. This results in an impaired ability to perform daily activities and tasks, and as the disease progresses, the symptoms become worse. In most cases Alzheimer’s disease progresses slowly however.

Symptoms include:

  • Memory loss
  • Vague everyday conversation
  • Loss of enthusiasm
  • Becoming disoriented
  • Social skill deterioration
  • Mood, personality and behaviour changes
  • Language difficulties

How does Alzheimer’s Dementia affect thinking?

Alzheimer’s disease has an array of cognitive and physical impacts on a person. Quite often memory loss is the first recognised symptom. Due to some insight in these early stages, the person may be aware when they struggle to remember, and then they can become agitated, aggressive or frustrated.

Appointing a Power of Attorney
Alzheimer’s disease impacts not only the person with the disease, but also their families. As the disease progresses, there will be more functional difficulties faced. it is important that once a diagnosis has been made, the family start to think about appointing a Power of Attorney. A Power of Attorney cannot be put in place unless the person with the disease has the mental capacity to agree to the decision and therefore timing is crucial.

Frontotemporal Dementia
Frontotemporal dementia is when there is progressive damage to the frontal and/or temporal lobes of the brain. Damage to the frontal lobes of the brain can result in reduced intellectual abilities, as well as changes in personality, emotion and behaviour. Damage to the temporal lobes can result in difficulty recognising objects, understanding or expressing language.

Frontotemporal dementia can affect anybody, however it usually affects people at a younger age than Alzheimer’s disease, with the symptoms appearing at age 50 or sometimes even earlier. Currently there is no definite understanding of who is likely to get frontotemporal dementia,however some research has found that approximately a third of people with frontotemporal dementia have a family history of dementia.

How does Frontotemporal Dementia affect thinking?

Frontotemporal dementia has many effects on the way a person thinks and interacts with the world around them. The changes that occur, depending on the area of the brain damaged, can quite often leave the person becoming quite frustrated or angry when they cannot do a task that they are trying to complete. This can mean that they believe that they cannot perform certain tasks, and therefore begin to lose motivation to try.

How may Frontotemporal Dementia affect everyday function?

The symptoms of frontotemporal dementia mean that there are a variety of impacts on the person’s life. For those who have damage to the frontal lobes, they experience behavioural, personality and emotional changes. These changes mean that they may come across as being selfish, lacking empathy, and being unkept. This can result in a loss of personal relationships or difficulty with making and maintaining new friendships.

For those who have damage to the temporal lobes, they experiences changes in their language abilities and recognition of familiar people. This means that they will frequently experience issues with reading, spelling, comprehension, verbal expression, and facial recognition. Consequently there can be a great impact on their ability to function at work, as well as at home with everyday tasks.

How can an assessment help?

A neuropsychology assessment can provide a baseline so that changes can be compared to determine progression of the dementia over time.  Clinical neuropsychology assessments can also be used in medicolegal cases, determining decision making capacity, and in identifying possible insurance recovery.

Clinical Neuropsychology assessments consist of an interview followed by a range of tests appropriate to the clients requirements. Results from the assessment are then used to create plans and/or recommendations for the individual.

Testing involves standardised tests that evaluate cognitive function in the following areas:

  • Cognitive ability
  • Memory
  • Reasoning
  • Problem solving
  • Emotions
  • Personality

Let us help you

Our caring team is here to help. Our services aim to help both your brain and body achieve optimal health. Contact our Neuropsychological & Neuromusculoskeletal team for effective advice, assessment and management of your concerns and issues.

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Preston, Victoria 3072

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