Traumatic Brain Injury2018-09-29T05:02:50+00:00

Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is when injury to the brain occurs by an external blow to the head. When the force hits your head, this causes the brain to move rapidly inside the skull. This can result in the brain becoming stretched, torn, bruised, penetrated, or swollen. Dependent on the severity and location of the injury, can have an impact on expected recovery time, and how successful rehabilitation can be.

People with a TBI can experience the following cognitive changes:

  • Fatigue and slowed responses
  • Memory issues
  • Reduced ability to concentrate or maintain attention
  • Susceptible to irritability, anger, and stress
  • Reduced ability to socialise appropriately
  • Lack of insight
  • Issues with problem solving and motivation
  • Lack of emotional control
  • Depression
  • Impulsivity

TBI can also result on a variety of physical changes such as:

  • Issues with balance and dizziness
  • Epilepsy and seizures
  • Loss of taste and smell
  • Headaches
  • Chronic pain
  • Visual problems
  • Fatigue
  • Paralysis or movement disorders

How can Jurmaine Health help with TBI?

Jurmaine Health Neuropsychologists can investigate the cognitive, emotional and behavioural effects of the brain and provide detailed assessments that assist in diagnosing the cognitive impacts of a traumatic brain injury and can plan treatment. The neuropsychology assessment can also help to provide a baseline so that changes can be compared to determine improvements or struggles over time.

Jurmaine Health Neuropsychology Assessments consist of an interview followed by a range of tests appropriate to the clients requirements. Results from the assessment are then used to create plans and/or recommendations for the individual, to aid improvement.
Diagnosis of the extent of the brain injury are often determined through a range of imaging tests such as, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-rays and intracranial pressure (ICP) monitors.

Open and closed TBI

There are two types of head injury, open and closed. Open is when the head hits an object or an object pierces the skull and the brain tissue. A closed injury occurs if the skull is not broken or penetrated and the brain has not been exposed. Examples of closed head injury includes when the head moves rapidly forward and backward, causing the brain to move inside the skull and slam against the skull bone.

Recovery

Depending on whether the brain injury is mild or severe, can mean that recovery is different for each person and is difficult to accurately determine how much a person will recover. Some people find that their lives eventually return to normal with some small lingering problems, while others with more severe injuries have continual disabilities that can be lifelong.
The greatest improvements are generally seen in the first year following the incident, however there is only a limited amount that the brain can heal. Major rehabilitation takes place in the first year when the greatest degree of recovery is possible. The effort put into rehabilitation has a large impact on the amount of recovery the person will experience. People who are more driven and motivated in the recovery stage are noted to have the best rehabilitation, even after the formal process has been completed.

How does Traumatic Brain Injury affect thinking?

TBI can affect several different areas of the brain, depending on where the person has had the injury, and can have totally different changes to their behaviour and thinking. One common change can be with processing speed. Meaning the person with the brain injury has slowed thinking and may take longer than usual to respond to a question or solve a problem. Others may problems with their memory, frequently forgetting things, or even having problems trying to retrieve memories from the past. Another change that some can experience is with speech. When there has been damage to the left side of the brain, the person may have trouble producing speech in a fluent format, or sometimes even at all. Due to there being so many changes that can happen following a TBI, the person can become frustrated at the loss of the abilities they once had. Often meaning they try to avoid activities or tasks that would require them to use the skill that they no longer have a grasp of to the same level.

How may Traumatic Brain Injury affect everyday function?

Following a TBI, the person can have a great deal of distress from the loss of normal functioning. Often they will experience difficulties with their family, friends or partners as they try to adapt to the changes in their lives. Not only can the brain injury affect relationships with close family and friends, but also has a large impact on social networks, vocational activities and recreational activities. Dependent on the extent or area of the brain that is injured, the person with the brain injury may not be able to perform tasks that they used to.
As well as changes with social and recreational aspects of their lives, people with a TBI commonly experience fatigue, and slowed processing speed. In some cases the person with a TBI may have altered personality, physical, sensory, thinking or learning abilities.

Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is when injury to the brain occurs by an external blow to the head. When the force hits your head, this causes the brain to move rapidly inside the skull. This can result in the brain becoming stretched, torn, bruised, penetrated, or swollen. Dependent on the severity and location of the injury, can have an impact on expected recovery time, and how successful rehabilitation can be.

People with a TBI can experience the following cognitive changes:

  • Fatigue and slowed responses
  • Memory issues
  • Reduced ability to concentrate or maintain attention
  • Susceptible to irritability, anger, and stress
  • Reduced ability to socialise appropriately
  • Lack of insight
  • Issues with problem solving and motivation
  • Lack of emotional control
  • Depression
  • Impulsivity

TBI can also result on a variety of physical changes such as:

  • Issues with balance and dizziness
  • Epilepsy and seizures
  • Loss of taste and smell
  • Headaches
  • Chronic pain
  • Visual problems
  • Fatigue
  • Paralysis or movement disorders
How can Jurmaine Health help with TBI?

Jurmaine Health Neuropsychologists can investigate the cognitive, emotional and behavioural effects of the brain and provide detailed assessments that assist in diagnosing the cognitive impacts of a traumatic brain injury and can plan treatment. The neuropsychology assessment can also help to provide a baseline so that changes can be compared to determine improvements or struggles over time.

Jurmaine Health Neuropsychology Assessments consist of an interview followed by a range of tests appropriate to the clients requirements. Results from the assessment are then used to create plans and/or recommendations for the individual, to aid improvement.
Diagnosis of the extent of the brain injury are often determined through a range of imaging tests such as, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-rays and intracranial pressure (ICP) monitors.

Open and closed TBI

There are two types of head injury, open and closed. Open is when the head hits an object or an object pierces the skull and the brain tissue. A closed injury occurs if the skull is not broken or penetrated and the brain has not been exposed. Examples of closed head injury includes when the head moves rapidly forward and backward, causing the brain to move inside the skull and slam against the skull bone.

Recovery

Depending on whether the brain injury is mild or severe, can mean that recovery is different for each person and is difficult to accurately determine how much a person will recover. Some people find that their lives eventually return to normal with some small lingering problems, while others with more severe injuries have continual disabilities that can be lifelong.
The greatest improvements are generally seen in the first year following the incident, however there is only a limited amount that the brain can heal. Major rehabilitation takes place in the first year when the greatest degree of recovery is possible. The effort put into rehabilitation has a large impact on the amount of recovery the person will experience. People who are more driven and motivated in the recovery stage are noted to have the best rehabilitation, even after the formal process has been completed.

How does Traumatic Brain Injury affect thinking?

TBI can affect several different areas of the brain, depending on where the person has had the injury, and can have totally different changes to their behaviour and thinking. One common change can be with processing speed. Meaning the person with the brain injury has slowed thinking and may take longer than usual to respond to a question or solve a problem. Others may problems with their memory, frequently forgetting things, or even having problems trying to retrieve memories from the past. Another change that some can experience is with speech. When there has been damage to the left side of the brain, the person may have trouble producing speech in a fluent format, or sometimes even at all. Due to there being so many changes that can happen following a TBI, the person can become frustrated at the loss of the abilities they once had. Often meaning they try to avoid activities or tasks that would require them to use the skill that they no longer have a grasp of to the same level.

How may Traumatic Brain Injury affect everyday function?

Following a TBI, the person can have a great deal of distress from the loss of normal functioning. Often they will experience difficulties with their family, friends or partners as they try to adapt to the changes in their lives. Not only can the brain injury affect relationships with close family and friends, but also has a large impact on social networks, vocational activities and recreational activities. Dependent on the extent or area of the brain that is injured, the person with the brain injury may not be able to perform tasks that they used to.
As well as changes with social and recreational aspects of their lives, people with a TBI commonly experience fatigue, and slowed processing speed. In some cases the person with a TBI may have altered personality, physical, sensory, thinking or learning abilities.

Let us help you

Our caring team is here to help. Our services aim to help both your brain and body achieve optimal health. Contact our Neuropsychological & Neuromusculoskeletal team for effective advice, assessment and management of your concerns and issues.

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